Mourning Flies

Some held a mass at her grave.
Petals strewn on the mild lave.
Granite-rose a gray façade,
Interred within where she strode.
A feast of inclusion frescoes on the base relief.
 
Some held sprays dabbing eyes,
Faux fantasies & sorrowful byes.
Some held her in and prayed for their grief,
Clutching filthsome divots-
Clumps of glass moldered tears wandering ash.
 
Witticisms escaping lips- smiles twisted,
A dissonance consigned to the riddle.
Her desertion – her ranging from them all,
The self- flying free from her angry vexing pall.

Nineteen, copyright ©2017 Aria Ligi The Australian Times

4 Replies to “Mourning Flies”

  1. Aria Ligi’s most recent poetry includes work that mingles and revitalizes conventional romantic imagery and gothic themes. In “Mourning Flies”, the title’s pun hints at Ligi’s juxtaposition of romantic conventions of mourning with the death-obsessed gothic. The poem is richly brocaded with the funereal detail of the era: “sprays dabbing eyes”, “filthsome divots”, and other antique references. But the “twisted smiles” and “witticisms” accompanying the accessories of mourning are like the gothic ‘flies” in their banal association with death. As Ligi’s last stanza reveals these mourners sentimentalize death; and in the departed spirit’s “desertion . . . from them all” she also takes flight from the pall of mortality and sentimental mourning. In imagining the escape of the dead from its conventional accoutrements, Ligi rescues and synthesizes the heart of romanticism and the gothic in a vision of escape from the material to the ethereal.

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